The Tasmanian City of ‘Makers’

Settled in 1827 as Emu Bay, Burnie was renamed in 1840 for William Burnie, a director of the Van Dieman’s Land Company. Burnie’s primary industries are industrial manufacturing, forestry and agriculture. For 75 years, until operations ceased in 2010 the Burnie Pulp Mill known by the locals as The Pulp was the primary employer within the region.Award-winning cheese and whisky is made at Burnie’s Hellyers Road Distillery

Since the downturn of its primary industries, Burnie has had more focus on craftsmanship from its most creative residents. Home to the Makers’ Workshop, a contemporary structure opened in 2009 to support local artisans, studios and local craftspeople – a must-see when visiting Burnie. As well as amazing artwork, award-winning cheese and whisky is made at Burnie’s Hellyers Road Distillery – Australia’s largest boutique whisky distillery.

Home to Tasmania’s first Farmers’ Market which now also includes art and craft stalls, Burnie is situated around Emu Bay so the beach is only ever a stone’s throw away. Burnie also has a wonderful range of restaurants and cafes, and if you’re after some tasty cheese or a dram of Whiskey they also make them too!

Burnie is situated around Emu Bay so the beach is only ever a stone’s throw away

Burnie is full of rich history and natural beauty and is a great place to explore if you’re driving up the north-west coast of Tasmania. There are plenty of walks and local attractions including the Burnie Regional Museum and Burnie Regional Art Gallery. The CBD also includes a range of popular retails chains and supermarkets.

Burnie City • North West

The Tasmanian City of ‘Makers’